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FICTIONAL CHARACTER

Pronunciation (US): 

 Dictionary entry overview: What does fictional character mean? 

FICTIONAL CHARACTER (noun)
  The noun FICTIONAL CHARACTER has 1 sense:

1. an imaginary person represented in a work of fiction (play or film or story)

  Familiarity information: FICTIONAL CHARACTER used as a noun is very rare.


 Dictionary entry details 


FICTIONAL CHARACTER (noun)


Sense 1fictional character [BACK TO TOP]

Meaning:

An imaginary person represented in a work of fiction (play or film or story)

Classified under:

Nouns denoting people

Synonyms:

character; fictional character; fictitious character

Context example:

she is the main character in the novel

Hypernyms ("fictional character" is a kind of...):

imaginary being; imaginary creature (a creature of the imagination; a person that exists only in legends or myths or fiction)

Instance hyponyms:

Merlin ((Arthurian legend) the magician who acted as King Arthur's advisor)

Holmes; Sherlock Holmes (a fictitious detective in stories by A. Conan Doyle)

Simon Legree (the cruel slave dealer in an anti-slavery novel by Harriet Beecher Stowe)

Sinbad; Sinbad the Sailor (in the Arabian Nights a hero who tells of the fantastic adventures he had in his voyages)

Snoopy (a fictional beagle in a comic strip drawn by Charles Schulz)

Ali Baba (the fictional woodcutter who discovered that 'open sesame' opened a cave in the Arabian Nights' Entertainment)

Emile (the boy whose upbringing was described by Jean-Jacques Rousseau)

agonist; protagonist (the principal character in a work of fiction)

Houyhnhnm (one of a race of intelligent horses who ruled the Yahoos in a novel by Jonathan Swift)

Uncle Sam (a personification of the United States government)

Uncle Tom (a servile black character in a novel by Harriet Beecher Stowe)

Pierrot (a male character in French pantomime; usually dressed in white with a whitened face)

Pluto (a cartoon character created by Walt Disney)

Huck Finn; Huckleberry Finn (a mischievous boy in a novel by Mark Twain)

Rip van Winkle (the title character in a story by Washington Irving about a man who sleeps for 20 years and doesn't recognize the world when he wakens)

Ruritanian (an imaginary inhabitant of Ruritania)

Tarzan; Tarzan of the Apes (a man raised by apes who was the hero of a series of novels by Edgar Rice Burroughs)

Tom Sawyer (the boy hero of a novel by Mark Twain)

Uncle Remus (the fictional storyteller of tales written in the Black dialect and set in the south of the United States; the tales were first collected and published in book form in 1880)

Little John (legendary follower of Robin Hood; noted for his size and strength)

Little Red Riding Hood (a girl in a fairy tale who meets a wolf while going to visit her grandmother)

Trilby (singer in a novel by George du Maurier who was under the control of the hypnotist Svengali)

Walter Mitty (fictional character created by James Thurber who daydreams about his adventures and triumphs)

Yahoo (one of a race of brutes resembling men but subject to the Houyhnhnms in a novel by Jonathan Swift)

Arthur; King Arthur (a legendary king of the Britons (possibly based on a historical figure in the 6th century but the story has been retold too many times to be sure); said to have led the Knights of the Round Table at Camelot)

Galahad; Sir Galahad ((Arthurian legend) the most virtuous knight of the Round Table; was able to see the Holy Grail)

Gawain; Sir Gawain ((Arthurian legend) a nephew of Arthur and one of the knights of the Round Table)

Guenevere; Guinevere ((Arthurian legend) wife of King Arthur; in some versions of the legend she became Lancelot's lover and that led to the end of the Knights of the Round Table)

Lancelot; Sir Lancelot ((Arthurian legend) one of the knights of the Round Table; friend of King Arthur until (according to some versions of the legend) he became the lover of Arthur's wife Guinevere)

Sweeney Todd; Todd (fictional character in a play by George Pitt; a barber who murdered his customers)

Svengali (the musician in a novel by George du Maurier who controls Trilby's singing hypnotically)

Raskolnikov; Rodya Raskolnikov (a fictional character in Dostoevsky's novel 'Crime and Punishment'; he kills old women because he believes he is beyond the bounds of good or evil)

Robin Hood (legendary English outlaw of the 12th century; said to have robbed the rich to help the poor)

Robinson Crusoe (the hero of Daniel Defoe's novel about a shipwrecked English sailor who survives on a small tropical island)

Rumpelstiltskin (a dwarf in one of the fairy stories of the brothers Grimm; tells a woman he will not hold her to a promise if she can guess his name and when she discovers it he is so furious that he destroys himself)

Shylock (a merciless usurer in a play by Shakespeare)

Tristan; Tristram ((Middle Ages) the nephew of the king of Cornwall who (according to legend) fell in love with his uncle's bride (Iseult) after they mistakenly drank a love potion that left them eternally in love with each other)

Iseult; Isolde ((Middle Ages) the bride of the king of Cornwall who (according to legend) fell in love with the king's nephew (Tristan) after they mistakenly drank a love potion that left them eternally in love with each other)

Scaramouch; Scaramouche (a stock character in commedia dell'arte depicted as a boastful coward)

Pied Piper; Pied Piper of Hamelin (the title character in a German folk tale and in a poem by Robert Browning)

Peter Pan (the main character in a play by J. M. Barrie; a boy who won't grow up)

Perry Mason (fictional detective in novels by Erle Stanley Gardner)

Chicken Little (a fictional character who was hit on the head with an acorn and believed that the sky was falling)

Cinderella (a fictional young girl who is saved from her stepmother and stepsisters by her fairy godmother and a handsome prince)

Colonel Blimp (a pompous reactionary cartoon character created by Sir David Low)

Dracula (fictional vampire in a gothic horror novel by Bram Stoker)

Don Quixote (the hero of a romance by Cervantes; chivalrous but impractical)

El Cid (the hero of a Spanish epic poem from the 12th century)

Fagin (a villainous Jew in a novel by Charles Dickens)

Falstaff; Sir John Falstaff (a dissolute character in Shakespeare's plays)

Cheshire cat (a fictional cat with a broad fixed smile on its face; created by Lewis Carroll)

John Henry (hero of American folk tales; portrayed as an enormously strong black man who worked on the railroads and died from exhaustion after winning a contest with a steam drill)

Argonaut ((Greek mythology) one of the heroes who sailed with Jason on the Argo in search of the Golden Fleece)

Babar (an imaginary elephant that appears in a series of French books for children)

Beatrice (the woman who guided Dante through Paradise in the Divine Comedy)

Beowulf (the legendary hero of an anonymous Old English epic poem composed in the early 8th century; he slays a monster and becomes king but dies fighting a dragon)

Bluebeard ((fairytale) a monstrous villain who marries seven women; he kills the first six for disobedience)

Bond; James Bond (British secret operative 007 in novels by Ian Fleming)

Brer Rabbit (the fictional character of a rabbit who appeared in tales supposedly told by Uncle Remus and first published in 1880)

Bunyan; Paul Bunyan (a legendary giant lumberjack of the north woods of the United States and Canada)

Father Brown (a Catholic priest who was the hero of detective stories by G. K. Chesterton)

Faust; Faustus (an alchemist of German legend who sold his soul to Mephistopheles in exchange for knowledge)

Lilliputian (a 6-inch tall inhabitant of Lilliput in a novel by Jonathan Swift)

Marlowe; Philip Marlowe (tough cynical detective (one of the early detective heroes in American fiction) created by Raymond Chandler)

Micawber; Wilkins Micawber (fictional character created by Charles Dickens; an eternal optimist)

Mother Goose (the imaginary author of a collection of nursery rhymes)

Mr. Moto (Japanese sleuth created by John Marquand)

Othello (the hero of William Shakespeare's tragedy who would not trust his wife)

Pangloss (an incurable optimist in a satire by Voltaire)

Pantaloon (a character in the commedia dell'arte; portrayed as a foolish old man)

King Lear; Lear (the hero of William Shakespeare's tragedy who was betrayed and mistreated by two of his scheming daughters)

Kilroy (a nonexistent person popularized by American servicemen during World War II)

Frankenstein (the fictional Swiss scientist who was the protagonist in a gothic novel by Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley; he created a monster from parts of corpses)

Frankenstein; Frankenstein's monster (the monster created by Frankenstein in a gothic novel by Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley (the creator's name is commonly used to refer to his creation))

Goofy (a cartoon character created by Walt Disney)

Gulliver (a fictional Englishman who travels to the imaginary land of Lilliput in a satirical novel by Jonathan Swift)

Hamlet (the hero of William Shakespeare's tragedy who hoped to avenge the murder of his father)

Captain Horatio Hornblower; Horatio Hornblower (a fictional English admiral during the Napoleonic Wars in novels written by C. S. Forester)

Iago (the villain in William Shakespeare's tragedy who tricked Othello into murdering his wife)

Commissaire Maigret; Inspector Maigret (a fictional detective in novels by Georges Simenon)

Aladdin (in the Arabian Nights a boy who acquires a magic lamp from which he can summon a genie)


 Learn English with... Proverbs of the week 
"April showers bring May flowers." (English proverb)

"Half-truth is more dangerous than falsehood." (Bengali proverb)

"Forgetness is the plague of knowledge." (Arabic proverb)

"Postponement is cancellation." (Dutch proverb)

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